12 February 2009

MISSALE PARISIENSE

Browsing the other day through this Gallican (Gallican in the French eighteenth century sense of emphasising a degree of independance from Rome; not in the pre-Carolingian sense) Missal, I was struck by how right Dom Gueranger was to campaign for the elimination of these confected late French 'rites'. But there are good things in them. At a time when new propers issued from Rome tended to be a trifle prolix, there's an elegant simplicity about some 'Gallican' collects. Take this one, for the Five Wounds (Feria VI post Cineres):
Concede, quaesumus, misericors Deus; ut sacrae Unigeniti tui plagae sint nobis medela vulnerum et fontes salutis aeternae.
Good, yes? A lot of ideas in a few words. And here's one for the Mater Dolorosa (Feria VI post Dominicam Passionis), not quite so tight but still attractive:
Interveniat pro nobis, quaesumus, Domine, apud tuam clementiam, nunc et in hora mortis nostrae, beata Virgo Maria mater tua, cuius animam, in hora passionis tuae, doloris gladius pertransivit.
Incidentally, 'Paris' renamed the Dedication of S Michael " S Michael and All Angels". I wonder if they got this idea from Cranmer's Calendar. There were links between the 'Gallicans' and the Anglicans; I suspect the Gallicans thought Anglicans were rather like themselves but had taken local autonomy a trifle too far, while Anglicans saw the French as Sound Chaps who might easily be persuaded to go the whole hog.

Would anybody care to translate those collects for the Greater Good?

PS: According to 'Paris', one covered one's head with one's amice in the winter, assuming the biretta between Easter and the Octave of S Denis. Reminded me of the practice in our Capella Regia of celebrating Easter by migrating out of the Tudor Chapel in S James's, adorned with Aragonese pomegranites, into the light and airy chapel put up by Inigo Jones for Henrietta Maria.

8 comments:

Adrian Furse said...

Grant we beseech thee, O merciful God; that the Holy Wounds of Your only-begotten Son may be for us a cure for wounds and the source of eternal life.

We beseech thee O Lord in thy mercy that the Blessed Virgin Mary, Your mother, may stand surety for us, who in the hour of Thy Passion was pierced through with the sword of sorrow

Well that's a fairly literal rendering of both of them, into an appropriate register of language. While not perhaps as elegant as they could be I hope they will suffice.

Gengulphus said...

Thank you for the translation.

I wonder if apud tuam clementiam would not be better taken as defining the operation of the verb interveniat?

johnreuben said...

Another offering:

Concede, quaesumus, misericors Deus; ut sacrae Unigeniti tui plagae sint nobis medela vulnerum et fontes salutis aeternae.

Grant, we beseech thee, O merciful God, that the holy stripes of thine only-begotten Son may be to us the healing of our wounds and the springs of everlasting salvation.



Interveniat pro nobis, quaesumus, Domine, apud tuam clementiam, nunc et in hora mortis nostrae, beata Virgo Maria mater tua, cuius animam, in hora passionis tuae, doloris gladius pertransivit.


O Lord, in thy mercy, we beseech thee; let the Blessed Virgin Mary, thy mother, whose soul the sword of sorrow did pierce at the time of thy passion, be an advocate for us, now and at the hour of our death.

(I hope you are not going to be giving us marks for our translations!)

Fr John Hunwicke SSC, said...

Nice ones, both pairs. Liturgiam Authenticam wanted both literalness and a following of the word-order of the Latin. But the only way of doing the latter with the second collect would be to abandon precision and go for something like "Hear the intercessions made in the presence of thy mercy, now and in the hour of our death, by .." etc. Not easy, is it? It will be interesting to see New ICEL's versions of the collects in Ordinary Time: how will they compare with Cranmer?

Fr John Hunwicke SSC, said...

Is Gengulphus an admirer of the late Mme Recamier, and if so, why? If not, who is the lady?

Gengulphus said...

Is Gengulphus an admirer of the late Mme Recamier, and if so, why? If not, who is the lady?

Dear Father,

Alas my murderous wife indulged in avant-garde fancy dress. The punishment - unique in Christian hagiography - which was visited upon her is told here:
http://www.gengulphus.org/index.
php/home/of_the_wife

But your chastening comment has obliged me to appear henceforth in propria persona.

John F H H said...

I have before me Missel de Paris, Latin-François, ...Imprimé par Ordre de Monseigneur L'Archêveque [in 8 Vols] Paris 1741

I found the first collect [the Mass of the Five Wounds] with little difficulty.
I was amused by the rendering into French of Concede,quæsumus and thought it worth sharing:
Faites, s'il vous plaît, Dieu de bonté, que nous trouvions dans les plaies sacrées de votre Fils unique, la guérison de toutes blessures de peché, & la source de salut éternel, Par le même Jesus-Christ votre Fils notre Seigneur, qui étant Dieu vit & régne, &c.

One may compare this with the prolix collect of the Sarum Missal [unfortunately I do not have access to the Latin] with Wickham Legg's translation in brackets]:
O Lord, Jesus Christ, Son of the living God, who camest down from heaven to earth from the bosom of the Father, and barest [didst bear] five wounds upon the wood of the cross, and didst shed Thy precious blood for the remission [forgiveness] of our sins: we humbly beseech Thee, that in the day of judgement we may be set at Thy right hand, and me found meet [worthy] to hear from Thee those most comfortable words [that most sweet word]: Come ye blessed into the kingdom of my Father. Who lives and reignest with the same Father. In the unity of the Holy Spirit.

One is tempted to ask whether it was Cranmer's familiarity with this collect which led to the "Come ye blessed of my Father" in the 1549 Prayer Book Burial Office. Alas, Brightman only directs us to the reference in St.Matthew's Gospel.

I had more difficulty with Fr.Hunwicke's second collect: my Missel has for
Le Vendredi de la Semaine de Passion
the Mass of La Compassion de la Ste Vierge with this Collect:
Da, quæsumus, Domine, cordibus nostris intimum veræ pietatis affectum, ut in tui Filii passione, sanctissimæ matris ejus digne compatientes, saluataris mysterii fructum percipere mereamur, Per eundem.
Which is rendered:
Repandez dans nos cœurs, ô mon Dieu, les rendres sentimens d'une véritable piété, afin compatissant aux souffrances de votre Fils unique avec sa mere, nous recevions comme elle le fruit du mystére qui opére notre salut; Par le même J.C.N.S


This Collect also appears in a Missale Condomiense of 1763.

Anyway, my question: What is the relationship between Fr.Hunwicke's Missale Parisiense and the Missel de Paris of 1741?

Regards
John UK

Fr John Hunwicke SSC, said...

Sorry we didn't have longer to talk on Saturday. I have never seen a Missal of the diocese of Condom; Bossuet, of course, was bishop there before he went on to Meaux (does anybody know where in England one could get sight of a Missale Meldense?).

Please, no cracks from the Course Tendency about the diocese of Condom.