22 October 2009

Canon Law

We Anglicans tend to be disgustingly ignorant on this subject.

For no particular reason, I found myself wondering, with regard to the Military Ordinaries they have in the RC Church: are Chaplains incardinated into their Ordinariates? Whom do Ordinariate clergy mention in the Canon?

By the way, a quite friendly RC blog gives a list of 'rites' that clergy in Pope Benedict's Ordinariates would be restricted to. But surely, these structures and their clergy will be part of the Latin Church. So, surely, they will have access to the provisions of Summorum Pontificum?

10 comments:

Steve Cavanaugh said...

I do not believe that clergy who serve in the Military Ordinariate here in the U.S. are incardinated into the Archdiocese of the Military...they are "on loan" by their bishops. See this info on Recruitment for the U.S. Ordinariate.

That may be why there will be a new ordinariate, a personal one. Like Personal Prelatures, clergy would be incardinated (it certainly seemed to be implied by the Press Conference and Note from CDF), but like Ordinariates would not be world-wide, but national/regional.

The Flying Dutchman said...
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The Flying Dutchman said...

Article VI of the Apostolic Constitution Spirituali Militum Curae permits, but does not mandate, the incardination of priests into Military Ordinariates.

PG said...

In Italy the military chaplains are incardinated in the Ordinariate and go to a special seminary for military chaplains (http://www.ordinariato.it/seminario/index.asp#archivio)

The UK Ordinariate does not incardinate.

PG said...

With regards to the question of Summorum Pontificum. It seems that in Milan this is being interpreted as allowing the previous Ambrosian Rite and the Dominicans seem to be using it to allow the previous Dominican Rite - so really it should allow the Anglicans to use the liturgical books in force in Anglican churches in 1962 rather than "common worship".

Michael McDonough said...

Fr. H.,

If the analogy with the "Anglican Use" parishes in the USA holds up, then yes, the Ordinariates will also have access to both forms of the Latin Rite. This "Anglican Use" parish has a bit of a description of their liturgies: [http://www.atonementonline.com/index.php]. I do know that Fr. Phillips offered the EF at some point in the past, but the Mass was poorly attended, and was discontinued.

Maurice said...

In the UK military chaplains are incardinated into a regular diocese and remain incardinated in that diocese throughout their time in the forces. They remain, for example, a Westminster priest working, for the time being, in the military. Haven't a clue what happens in the US.

Pedes Christi said...

Clergy in the U.S. remain incardinated in their dioceses. However, the notion of a "personal" ordinariate seems to mean that priests would be incardinated in it, and that laity would belong to it as well. From the press release, and looking at what some canonists have said, it appears that these laity would not necessarily belong to the local RC diocese. However, it appears the ordinariate would be part of the national bishops' conferences. Of course we await the details. It will be interesting to see how they will deal with this whole group of ordinates as a whole—one assumes there will be some kind of juridical structure over all of them.

As for Summorum Pontificum, whould this mean that the last Catholic rite in force, i.e., the pre-Reformation rites would be permitted to be used. They were never suppressed, although they fell into disuetude. I would hope they would be, as they form part of our heritage, and could serve the same purpose of providing a rich source of tradition for moving forward with liturgical renewal as the Holy Father intends by authorizing the missal of Pope John XXIII. As it is, while the Book of Divine Worship is certainly a great improvement over the run of the mill Novus Ordo, it suffers from many of the defect both of the Novus Ordo and of the prayer book tradition, including some less than ideal translation of the Bible and of the Latin liturgy. This includes some of Cranmer's collects, which, while being better that the ICEL translations presently in use, nonetheless miss or obscure some of the important doctrinal or spiritual points of the Latin originals.

My fervent hope is that eventually the prayer book/Sarum propers, including good collects that are now no longer found in any present liturgy, and the once widespread Northern European practice of dating Sundays after Trinity will be preserved. It would also be great to see such treasures as the beautiful Sarum order for Compline and the Sarum chants revived.

Steve said...
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Steve said...

"We Anglicans tend to be disgustingly ignorant on [canon law]".

Well, I'm sure you're right, whether you mean Church of England or Roman Catholic canon law: but as a matter of interest, which DO you mean?