5 November 2010

November 5, the Feast of the Holy Relics

What a wholesome liturgical instinct this festival represents. In the medieval English rites, it tried out various dates; May 22 or the Monday after the Ascension at Exeter; the Sunday after the Translation of S Thomas (July 7) at Hereford and Sarum - although Sarum notes that 'nuper' it occupied the Octave Day of our Lady's Nativity, with an appropriate Collect "Grant we beseech thee Almighty God, that the merits may protect us of the holy Mother of God and Ever Virgin Mary and of thy Saints whose relics are kept in this church ...". The traditional Benedictine rite keeps this festival on May 13, presumably a learned allusion to the Dedication of the Pantheon in Rome, upon this day, as the Church of Sancta Maria ad Martyres.

Before the reforms of S Pius X, this festival occurred among the Masses For Some Places on October 26, or on the Last Sunday of October (October was a good month for avoiding Sunday masses; by indult the English RC dioceses observed the Motherhood, the Purity, and the Patronage of our Lady respectively on the second, third, and fourth Sundays). After Pius X, the Feast of the Relics settled onto a day suitably within the Octave of All Saints, November 5, where it was observed by papal indult in certain places, often as a Greater Double; for example, in the diocese of Oxford within the Archdeaconries of Oxford and Berkshire but not in that of Buckinghamshire. As the learned and ever gracious Rubricarius kindly established yesterday, the colour to be used is red. This is consistent with the fact that the Office is the Common of Many Martyrs, despite the fact that not all the Saints whose relics we this day venerate were martyred. Perhaps we may relate this usage to the primitive notion that the Martyrs are the prototypical saints; that the unmartyred sancti et sanctae in a sense just piggy-back along upon the martyrs.

Frankly, one does sometimes feel tempted to turn to Byzantine sources to get a richer mixture than one always finds in formal Western texts (Sessio xxv of Trent is sound enough on the relics but a trifle sober). So the proper lections at Mattins for this feast are from that splendid Doctor who was probably not Dr Bugnini's bedside reading: S John of Damascus (Eric Mascall once observed the propensity of Roman liturgists to resort to Eastern sources whenever they needed to say something 'extreme'). "For since Life itself and the Author of Life was numbered among the dead, we do not call those who finished their last day in the hope of Resurrection and of faith in Him 'Dead'. For how can a dead body utter miracles? Through relics the devils are cast out, diseases sent fleeing, the sick healed, the blind see ..." etc. etc.. The Collect is a fine composition which likewise sees the miracles performed through the relics of Saints as pledges of the Resurrection: Increase in us O Lord our faith in the Resurrection, who in the relics of thy Saints dost perform marvellous works: and make us partakers of the immortal glory of which our veneration of their ashes [cineres] is a pledge.

This celebration disappeared during the Bugninireich for presumably the same reasons that at the same time caused the Jesuits, who then occupied the Church of S Alyoggers in this city, to have a massive bonfire of all the relics and reliquaries in their splendid Relics Chapel. Mercifully, the gracious spirit of S Philip Neri has now restored the lost glories. Today's feast is, in my view, rich in themes for evangelical preaching and teaching, and ripe for revival. It teaches the goodness of material things against a false 'spiritualism'; it preaches the ultimately indissoluble link between Body and Soul against the sub-Christian notion that only the soul really matters; it proclaims the transforming eschatological glory which will clothe this perishable with what is imperishable, and this mortal with what is immortal, in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trumpet.

7 comments:

Albertus said...

''Today's feast is, in my view, rich in themes for evangelical preaching and teaching, and ripe for revival. It teaches the goodness of material things against a false 'spiritualism'; it preaches the ultimately indissoluble link between Body and Soul against the sub-Christian notion that only the soul really matters; it proclaims the transforming eschatological glory which will clothe this perishable with what is imperishable, and this mortal with what is immortal, in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trumpet.''

Again, very beautifully put. May the Saints richly reward you for your eloquence in defending the feast and the cult of their relics. I am always very impressed by the Propers and Orations of this feast, and find it very suitable to celebrate within the Octave of All Saints.

The Flying Dutchman said...

I would be very interested in the original Latin of the collect for this feast.

Joshua said...

Auge in nobis, Domine, resurrectionis fidem, qui in Sanctorum tuorum reliquiis mirabilia operaris: et fac nos immortalis gloriƦ participes, cujus in eorum cineribus pignora veneramur. Per...

Joshua said...

As a matter of curiosity, Fr H., whose relics are enshrined in the altar at St Thos. the Martyr?

Fr John Hunwicke SSC, said...

Ss Castus et Modestus. (No joke!)

You're keeping well, Joshua? Not planning to visit Blighty some time?

Joshua said...

Not, as Knox would have it, SS Promiscuus & Miscellaneus, MM (feast: 30 Feb.)?

I'll be back in the old country in September, Deo volente.

The Flying Dutchman said...

Thank you, Joshua!