28 June 2010

Precision

I have previously recommended the St Lawrence Press ORDO; it is a can't-do-without for those interested in the Roman Rite at the point before Pius XII and a youthful Bugnini began the long journey to the Novus Ordo. In the Blogosphere, The St Lawrence Press Blog relates to that liturgical dispensation.

Like many people, I have often used the term 'Tridentine' in a loose way; although I have sometimes been careful! For an example of Hunwicke-being-careful, I would refer you to my statement that, on the Sundays after Trinity/Pentecost, we are encouraged by Tradition to use the Preface of the Trinity. I was perfectly aware that this was an eighteenth century modification of the Roman Rite, but I didn't want to overload the narrative I was pursuing. The tradition of thus using that Preface is some 250 years old, which is, for me, good enough reason to deploy the term 'Tradition'. I find it an edifying and attractive organic and evolutionary development. As well (I fear this is a trifle Enlightenment) very usefully didactic.

If 'Tridentine' is to refer to the liturgical books of S Pius V, as I think it probably should, then you can find out about the Tridentine Rite by looking at another blog by the same erudite author, called The Tridentine Rite. There you will discover that the Common Preface is used on these green Sundays! You will also, I suspect, be surprised by some of the rather Puritanical prunings of the Calendar: for example, the elimination of 'non-biblical' feasts such as S Anne and the Presentation of our Lady. They soon returned, by popular demand; but they had sunk without trace under Pius V.

And the Office Hymns, of course, will be not those with which users of the 1962 books are familiar. Those texts were produced in the 1620s by Urban VIII, aka Papa Barberini. The breviary of S Pius V had the ancient texts, sometimes totally different from the Barberini versions, which one will also find in the Sarum and Benedictine Breviaries.

If we all survive until 2012, you are set up for another shock as you peruse The Tridentine Rite Blog. The liturgical books of S Pius V presuppose ... of course ... the Julian calendar. And in 2012, the Julian Easter will be a week later than that of the Gregorian calendar! And in 2013, five weeks later! But, of course, the Eschaton ...

I once did a holiday locum for a bossy priest who officiously told me to use "1662 word for word". I was gravely tempted to do as he said, but, when it came to point of explaining to his congregation (which had celebrated Easter a couple of weeks earlier) that today was really the fourth ... or was it fifth ... Sunday of Lent, it was too much for me. I chickened.

8 comments:

Chris said...

And did you pray "...ſo rule the heart of Thy choſen ſervant Charles, our King and Governour..."?

bob said...

Fifth Sunday IN Lent

davidforster said...

I seem to remember, that when serving at mass at Milton Manor not so long ago, we had a Requiem mass. Since we were using the very Missal of Bishop Challoner, we did not have the preface for the dead, but used the Common preface, which is what the missal said to use. I don't remember what year this preface was introduced, but it wasn't 1570.

Rubricarius said...

The preface of the dead was introduced on 9 April 1919 by Benedict XV.

Patricius said...

I don't mind the Preface of the Dead, despite its modernity.

Chris said...

Using the Preface of the Trinity on Sundays after Trinity may only date from the 18th century at Rome, but it's there in Sarum.

John F H H said...

Chris,
May I ask where you obtained the font for the long 's'?
Regards
John U.K.

Chris said...

Unicode characters, I copy and paste from http://www.decodeunicode.org/en/u+017f

There is a way to type them in directly, but I can never remember it.